phone +66 (0)2 115 8105
emailinfo@raitongorganicsfarm.com
RAITONG ORGANICS FARM CO., LTD.

We believe... that being creative and innovative, and engouraging an active community

of farmers and consumers is the future of organic food cultivation in Thailand

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ABOUT US

 

 

 

WE ARE

Raitong Organics Farm Co. Ltd., a social enterprise based in Bangkok, was established in 2007 to create a thriving and sustainable community of Thai farmers and customers. In this relationship, we promote organic and natural farming methods as a way to improve the well-being and dignity of Thai farmers and as a way to ensure that our customers have access to the best quality and most nutritious food that we can produce.

 


FARMING

OTHER PROJECTS

    Organic farming in Thailand

    Under Construction
    The four principles of organic agriculture are as follows (IFOAM, September 2005):
    • The Principle of Health - Organic agriculture should sustain and enhance the health of soil, plant, animal and human as one and indivisible.
    • The Principle of Ecology - Organic agriculture should be based on living ecological systems and cycles, work with them, emulate them and help sustain them.
    • The Principle of Fairness - Organic agriculture should build on relationships that ensure fairness with regard to the common environment and life opportunities.
    • The Principle of Care - Organic agriculture should be managed in a precautionary and responsible manner to protect the health and well being of current and future generations and the environment

    Organic training for farmers

    The farmers we work with have vastly different understandings of what organic agriculture is, depending on how long they’ve been farming for, where they’ve been farming, their cultural backgrounds, prior training, direct experience of health-related impacts of chemical farming, interactions with the market, and so on. This means that much of our work entails working with these farmers to ensure that they all understand what organics really is, how to achieve the standards that are required, and what comes after that.
    food//hack@BKK
    Open-source food explorations in BKK and beyond: learn stuff. make stuff. eat stuff. drink stuff.
    Teaching people about organic agriculture and food in general is a critical part of the work we do, especially as people become more and more detached from where food comes from, who grows/catches it, how it reaches your plate, and what the impacts of that process has been on people and the environment. This led us to develop a series of activities that we affectionately call:

    food//hack@BKK

    While many people associate the word "hacking" with a criminal act, the truth couldn't be more different. Hacking actually grew out the desire of computer programmers to explore systems and understand how they could be re-configured or re-programmed to function in new and better ways. Being a curious species though, the field developed in several directions, from the nefarious to the virtuous (although the line between the two is rarely easy to draw); however, in spite of this, intense curiosity has always been in the heart of the hacker. Much like the high-tech world of the computer software and hardware industries, industrial food and agriculture tend highly proprietary industries, with patents abounding and incredible degrees of secrecy. Conversely, just as hackers seek to understand how a particular piece of technology or software works, whether proprietary or open source, increasing numbers of people are looking to learn how their food and drinks are produced and by whom.
    food//hack@BKK, a new concept in the demystification of food in Bangkok (Thailand), seeks to bring together elements of the cooking, DIYbio, soft/hardware hacking, and P2P movements, with the intent of spawning collaborative innovation and understanding in the local culinary commons. "Local" in the context of Bangkok is a rather loose term, being one of the most densely populated cities in the world, and (temporary/permanent) home to people from around the globe. This incredible multicultural diversity has also had a tremendous impact in the culinary diversification, both in terms of strengthening the pre-existing Thai traditions, as well as those foods from other countries, but also in bringing traditions together in creative ways (sometimes for the better, other times not so much). The idea of the commons is also very much alive and well in traditional foods, usually fostering incredible degrees of innovation and creativity usually based on quality improvements (whether real or perceived). This is in sharp contrast to what happens in the world of the fast food, whether corporate and legal behemoths stifle any form of creativity in the relentless drive towards industrial standardisation, patenting and copyright. food//hack@BKK seeks to elevate the spirit behind the culinary commons, realising that this is where true innovation lies, where passion thrives, and where we are most likely to be able to develop organic communities of collaboration.
    Under the food//hack@BKK umbrella, the following subsets of activities are being developed:
    • LTL:food//hack@BKK (currently under development) is a food hacking forum for youth (ages 12-16) that focuses heavily on practical education (outdoor classroom), awareness raising (workshops and discussions) and bringing out curiosity (linking with food//hack@BKK projects) about food in a creative and supportive environment.
    • farm//hack (currently under development) is a farm-based mechanism whereby participants undertake work on farms in Thailand to meet certain predetermined needs over (usually) very short timelines.
    For more information on what's happening in the food and biology hacking (DIYbio) scene in SE and East Asia, have a look at this: http://tinyurl.com/a83p5vy.

    Objectives

    • To create a food-based community in Bangkok that seeks to unravel the mystery around food, in a spirit of curiosity and collaboration
    • To create a fluid space in which this community can explore food in a creative, scientific and exciting way that leads to improved understanding, awareness, appreciation and innovation

    What does food//hack@BKK do?

    During the initial stages of development, workshops are being held on a monthly basis in a hands-on classroom format. The day/date of the events are currently not fixed, and tend to take place based on the schedule of the trainer(s). Participants are informed about the topic, date and time beforehand (and a few other minimal details, e.g., "blood and gore", "alcohol", etc. in case of squeamishness or other personal/religious constraints). The trainers/facilitators consist of artisans, professionals, housewives/husbands, farmers, or anyone else that is interested in teaching others about a particular aspect of food that they are knowledgeable about.
    As food//hack@BKK develops, it is hoped that a balance will be struck between this initial format (one-off events) and a more collaborative workspace (ongoing participation) in which members spawn their own projects (either in a central brick-and-mortar hackerspace or other venue/arrangement of their choice) and networks. LTL:food//hack@BKK participants will be encouraged to play a role in the projects developed through food//hack@BKK and farm//hack, as part of an active mentoring process. LTL:food//hack@BKK consists of one-off events, presentations, collaborative workspaces in schools, field trips, and the option for food//hack@BKK participants/trainers to play mentoring roles in youth projects. This is being developed and will still undergo some change. farm//hack seeks to get urbanites onto farms (rural, peri-urban and urban) for one or more days to undertake (usually quick) on-the-ground projects through flash-mobbing, agrotourism, wwoofing, etc. Projects could include: construction of chicken coops/tractors, mechanical repair, building mushroom sheds, assisting in planting/harvesting, installing water pumps, etc. The list is endless :)

    Urban Beekeeping

    Bringing together new and old beekeepers in Bangkok for the Asian Honeybee! If you'd like to know more about our work, get in touch via email and check out our realtime map of hives and wild colonies in Bangkok. We are also on Facebook!

    Background

    Honeybees, solitary bees, bumblebees, bats, moths and ants are key pollinators, collectively responsible for much of the food that we eat daily; furthermore, it is estimated that fully one-third of all the food plants we eat depend specifically on bees for pollination. In spite of this importance in the global food chain and ecosystem, honeybees, as with many pollinators, around the world have come under threat due to a number of factors including:
    (a)  Foliar sprayed and systemic pesticides use, especially neonicotinoid-based pesticides, resulting in severe nervous and digestive damage (usually fatal). Registered neonicotinoid pesticides in active use in Thailand include: Acetamiprid, Clothianidin, Dinotefuran, Imidacloprid, Thiacloprid and Thiamethoxam.
    (b)  Increased use of GMO crops (esp. BT crops, such as cotton, corn and papaya), resulting in nervous tissue damage and memory impairment, leading to disorientation and eventually death.
    (c)   Habitat and biodiversity loss, resulting in significant competition for food resources and nest sites between native honeybees and the more aggressive imported European honeybees (Apis mellifera).
    (d)  Increased prevalence of large-scale monoculture cropping systems, resulting in poor nutritional diversity and diet-related stress/diseases, and eventually either swarming or colony collapse.
    (e)   Various pests and diseases due to stress (weather conditions, pollution, poor husbandry techniques, etc.).
    (f)   Extermination of valuable feral swarms in urban areas, usually due to ignorance (of their critical ecosystemic and species genetic value) and fear (of being stung), rather than requesting that swarms be removed properly and relocated elsewhere.
    As an indicator of the importance of healthybee colonies in the provision of critical pollination services, 60,000-120,000 European honeybees are required to pollinate just one acre (4,000m2) of fruit trees per day. On the other hand, some 250-750 bumblebees are required to pollinate the same area of fruit trees per day (however, it should be noted that bumblebees form much smaller colonies and exhibit vastly different pollination habits to honeybees). Unfortunately, the figures for Asian honeybees (Apis cerana), the focal species for this initiative, are as yet unknown.
    Urban beekeeping: Urban beekeeping is becoming an increasingly common activity amongst city-dwellers that (a) wish to take part in global efforts to save honeybees and ensure the perpetuation of their critical pollination services, (b) are interested in knowing the source of their honey and are concerned about contamination and food miles, and (c) wish to learn about animal husbandry irrespective of whether they reside in small houses, condominiums or shared accommodation.
    Urban beekeeping is becoming a growing trend around the world: Paris Opera House (Paris), Bank of England (London), New York rooftops (US), Hong Kong rooftops, etc. Much of the success of urban beekeeping is related to three factors: (a) cities usually have many more flowers over the course of the year than rural areas, resulting in an abundance of food for honeybees throughout the year, (b) cities usually have very little neonicotinoid pesticides in use, resulting in little to no chance of colony collapses, and (c) there are many more places for bees to form nests in cities (holes in trees, inside roofs, between walls, even inside your postbox, inside old boxes and tires, etc.).
    Asian honeybee: The Asian honeybee (Apis cerana) is native to South and Southeast Asia, sharing the range with the Giant honeybee (Apis dorsata) and Dwarf honeybee / Red dwarf honeybee (Apis florea), besides several other smaller communal and solitary bees, and bumblebees; however, the Asian honeybee is the only one to make comparatively larger quantities of honey and wax and is generally very docile, making husbandry relatively easy. The Asian honeybee makes medium-sized colonies in multi-comb nests usually in tree hollows and human structures, with complex thermo-regulation mechanisms to maintain the nest’s temperature and humidity within a very narrow band. The home-range (the distance from the nest that the worker bees harvest pollen) is only 1-2km.
    Of particular interest to commercial honeybee operations and customers alike in South and Southeast Asia should be the fact that Asian honeybees are also not affected by Varroa jacobsoni mites or Nosema ceranae that are often fatal in European honeybee colonies (meaning that it is generally much easier to have organic honey from Asian honeybees here in Thailand than from European honeybees).Honeybees, solitary bees, bumblebees, bats, moths and ants are key pollinators, collectively responsible for much of the food that we eat daily; furthermore, it is estimated that fully one-third of all the food plants we eat depend specifically on bees for pollination. In spite of this importance in the global food chain and ecosystem, honeybees, as with many pollinators, around the world have come under threat due to a number of factors including:
    Honeybees, solitary bees, bumblebees, bats, moths and ants are key pollinators, collectively responsible for much of the food that we eat daily; furthermore, it is estimated that fully one-third of all the food plants we eat depend specifically on bees for pollination. In spite of this importance in the global food chain and ecosystem, honeybees, as with many pollinators, around the world have come under threat due to a number of factors including:
    • Foliar sprayed and systemic pesticides use, especially neonicotinoid-based pesticides, resulting in severe nervous and digestive damage (usually fatal). Registered neonicotinoid pesticides in active use in Thailand include: Acetamiprid, Clothianidin, Dinotefuran, Imidacloprid, Thiacloprid and Thiamethoxam.
    • Increased use of GMO crops (esp. BT crops, such as cotton, corn and papaya), resulting in nervous tissue damage and memory impairment, leading to disorientation and eventually death.
    • Habitat and biodiversity loss, resulting in significant competition for food resources and nest sites between native honeybees and the more aggressive imported European honeybees (Apis mellifera).
    • Increased prevalence of large-scale monoculture cropping systems, resulting in poor nutritional diversity and diet-related stress/diseases, and eventually either swarming or colony collapse.
    • Various pests and diseases due to stress (weather conditions, pollution, poor husbandry techniques, etc.).
    • Extermination of valuable feral swarms in urban areas, usually due to ignorance (of their critical ecosystemic and species genetic value) and fear (of being stung), rather than requesting that swarms be removed properly and relocated elsewhere.
    As an indicator of the importance of healthybee colonies in the provision of critical pollination services, 60,000-120,000 European honeybees are required to pollinate just one acre (4,000m2) of fruit trees per day. On the other hand, some 250-750 bumblebees are required to pollinate the same area of fruit trees per day (however, it should be noted that bumblebees form much smaller colonies and exhibit vastly different pollination habits to honeybees). Unfortunately, the figures for Asian honeybees (Apis cerana), the focal species for this initiative, are as yet unknown.

    Urban beekeeping

    Urban beekeeping is becoming an increasingly common activity amongst city-dwellers that (a) wish to take part in global efforts to save honeybees and ensure the perpetuation of their critical pollination services, (b) are interested in knowing the source of their honey and are concerned about contamination and food miles, and (c) wish to learn about animal husbandry irrespective of whether they reside in small houses, condominiums or shared accommodation.
    Urban beekeeping is becoming a growing trend around the world: Paris Opera House (Paris), Bank of England (London), New York rooftops (US), Hong Kong rooftops, etc. Much of the success of urban beekeeping is related to three factors:
    • Cities usually have many more flowers over the course of the year than rural areas, resulting in an abundance of food for honeybees throughout the year,
    • Cities usually have very little neonicotinoid pesticides in use, resulting in little to no chance of colony collapses, and
    • There are many more places for bees to form nests in cities (holes in trees, inside roofs, between walls, even inside your postbox, inside old boxes and tires, etc.).

    Asian honeybee

    The Asian honeybee (Apis cerana) is native to South and Southeast Asia, sharing the range with the Giant honeybee (Apis dorsata) and Dwarf honeybee / Red dwarf honeybee (Apis florea), besides several other smaller communal and solitary bees, and bumblebees; however, the Asian honeybee is the only one to make comparatively larger quantities of honey and wax and is generally very docile, making husbandry relatively easy. The Asian honeybee makes medium-sized colonies in multi-comb nests usually in tree hollows and human structures, with complex thermo-regulation mechanisms to maintain the nest’s temperature and humidity within a very narrow band. The home-range (the distance from the nest that the worker bees harvest pollen) is only 1-2km.
    Of particular interest to commercial honeybee operations and customers alike in South and Southeast Asia should be the fact that Asian honeybees are also not affected by Varroa jacobsoni mites or Nosema ceranae that are often fatal in European honeybee colonies (meaning that it is generally much easier to have organic honey from Asian honeybees here in Thailand than from European honeybees).
    Learn more about our work by getting in touch via email and check out our realtime map of hives and wild colonies in Bangkok. We are also on Facebook!
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CONTACT US

 

 

You can find us on Sukhumvit Road, near Bang Chak BTS station.

Raitong Organic Farm Co., Ltd.

1940-1942 Sukhumvit Road

Bang Chak, Phra Khanong

Bangkok 10260 Thailand

icon 1 Sukhumvit 60 location

icon 2 +66 2 115-8105

icon 3www.raitongorganicsfarm.com

 

By consuming organic -- and especially agroecologically grown -- foods,

we support healthy farmers, healthy consumers and a healthier planet.


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